CuriShorts
CuriPow on 06/24/2021

Fighting For Latina and Caribbean Writers

Rosario Ferré is considered to be one of the most important women writers Puerto Rico and the Caribbean and a principal feminist voice in Latin America. She is the author of short-story collections, novels, children' books, poetry, literary criticism, and essays.

CuriPow on 06/22/2021

Juan Crow

"Juan Crow" is a term used for laws or policies related to the enforcement of immigration statues against Latin-Americans in the United States. The term is patterned after Jim Crow laws that enforced racial segregation and kept African Americans as an underclass.

CuriPow on 06/21/2021

Before Tucker There Was Patterson

In 1915 Frederick D Patterson was the first black to build cars between 1915-1919 and produced 150 cars in Ohio. According to advertisements, there were two models: a two-door touring car and a four-door roadster. The cars were run by a 30-horsepower, 4-cylinder engine and included a full floating rear axle, a suspension that sat on cantilever springs, electric starting and lighting and a split windshield for ventilation. The cost was around $850.

CuriPow on 06/20/2021

Therapy Engagement

Major Aida Nancy Sanchez, Army Medical Specialist Corps, served at the 95th Evacuation Hospital near Da Nang, from December 1970 to December 1971. As the first physical therapist assigned to the hospital, she had to set up a clinic in a quonset hut that had previously served as the Post Exchange. In the meantime, Sanchez treated as many as 70 patients a day, using a ward storage area as an office. This was the first sort of clinic ever established to aid wounded soldiers with physical therapy and recovery.

CuriPow on 06/19/2021

A Legacy To Remember

María Irene Fornés is one of the most influential Latina playwrights in the United States. Her career spans over forty years of excellence as a playwright, director, and teacher from the 1960's to the early twenty-first century. She has written over forty plays and has received numerous awards.

CuriPow on 06/18/2021

Activist For Rights Around The World

Jeanne Gauna was a politician and environmental-justice activist. Guana was also the co-founder of the SouthWest Organizing Project (SWOP), a prominent environmental and economic justice organization in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

CuriPow on 06/17/2021

Ignored For Twenty Years

Carlos Juan Finlay, a Cuban-American epidemiologist who discovered that yellow fever is transmitted from infected to healthy humans by a mosquito. Although he published experimental evidence of this discovery in 1886, his ideas were ignored for 20 years.

CuriPow on 06/16/2021

Ahead Of Her Time

Madeline Marcotte was born in February 1780 at Mackinac Island, the daughter of a French-Canadian fur trader Jean Baptiste Marcotte and Marie Nekesh, an Ottawa Indian. Madeline was only 3 months old when her father died. She was raised among her mother’s people in an Ottawa village at the mouth of the Grand River near Grand Haven Michigan. She must have been a person of some status there, as her grandfather was Chief Kewinoquot.

CuriPow on 06/15/2021

Before The Colonization Of The New World

A water feature found in the Maya city of Palenque, Mexico, is the earliest known example of engineered water pressure in the new world, according to a collaboration between two Penn State researchers, an archaeologist and a hydrologist.

CuriPow on 06/14/2021

By Any Means

Cathay Williams was born to an enslaved mother and a free father in Independence, Missouri in 1844. During her adolescence, she worked as a house slave on the Johnson plantation on the outskirts of Jefferson City, Missouri. In 1861, Union forces occupied Jefferson City during the early stages of the Civil War. At this time, captured slaves were officially designated as contraband and were forced to serve in military support roles such as cooks, laundresses, or nurses. Before her voluntary enlistment, at just 17 years old, Williams served as an Army cook and a washerwoman. In this role, she accompanied the infantry all over the country. Williams served under the service of General Philip Sheridan and witnessed the Red River Campaign and the Battle of Pea Ridge.

CuriPow on 06/13/2021

On To The Outer Limits

Franklin Chang-Díaz is a Costa Rican-born American physicist and the first Hispanic astronaut of Chinese descent.

CuriPow on 06/12/2021

From A Slave To A Philanthropist

Bridget "Biddy" Mason became one of the first prominent citizens and landowners in Los Angeles in the 1850s and 1860s.

CuriPow on 06/11/2021

Chinatown

Because they were forbidden from owning land, intermarrying with Whites, owning homes, working in many occupations, getting an education, and living in certain parts of the city or entire cities, the Chinese basically had no other choice but to retreat into their own isolated communities as a matter of survival.

CuriPow on 06/10/2021

E.G.O.T.

Rita Moreno became the first Hispanic American (and the second person ever) to have won an Oscar, a Grammy, a Tony, and an Emmy. Her career has spanned over 70 years; among her notable acting work are supporting roles in the musical films The King and I and West Side Story.

CuriPow on 06/09/2021

From Miltona to Toni

Toni Cade Bambara was born Miltona Mirkin Cadean. An acclaimed novelist, short story writer, and editor whose work is often seen as emblematic of African American women's literature in the 1960's. She spent her childhood and adolescent years in New York City and Jersey City, New Jersey where she was deeply influenced by the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s,

CuriPow on 06/08/2021

First Governor

Born in Honolulu as the son of Japanese immigrants, George Ariyoshi became the first governor of Japanese ancestry in the nation.

CuriPow on 06/07/2021

All-American

Donald Argee Barksdale learned the game of basketball in the parks and recreation centers that dotted the neighborhoods of Oakland, California during the days of his youth. He never played a minute of high school basketball at Berkeley High due to rules that limited the number of black players to one on varsity teams. The social barriers and racial quotas that threatened to derail his career from the very beginning failed to dampen the spirit of optimism in Barksdale.

CuriPow on 06/06/2021

Flying First Class

Ruth Carol Taylor was the first African-American airline flight attendant in America, She made the historic mark back on February 11, 1958.

CuriPow on 06/05/2021

Zoologist, Scholar And Bee Whisperer

Entomologist Charles Henry Turner was born in Cincinnati Ohio. His father, Thomas, was a church custodian and mother, Adeline, was a practical nurse. In high school, Turner was class valedictorian. He went on to study science at the University of Cincinnati where he earned his B.S. and M.S. degrees (both in Biology) in 1891 and 1892 respectively. Turner held various teaching positions including being appointed, in 1893, professor and department head at Clark College (now Clark University in Atlanta, Georgia). In 1905, he left Clark for Chicago where in 1907 he earned his Ph.D. in Zoology - becoming the first African-American to earn a Ph.D. in Zoology as well as the first African-American to earn a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.

CuriPow on 06/04/2021

Social Activist And Civic Leader

Vijaya Lakshmi Emani was an Indian American social activist known for her work against domestic violence and was a civic leader among the Indian American community in Cleveland, Ohio. Starting with Northeast Ohio Telugu Association, followed by the Federation of Indian Community Associations and with Greater Cleveland Asian Community, she was the president of the Federation of India Community and a board member of the Federation of India Community Associations (FICA).

CuriPow on 06/03/2021

1906 Bay Area Segregation

On October 11, 1906, the San Francisco Board of Education attempted to force the 93 Japanese students who were attending public school in San Francisco to attend the segregated Chinese school. The school board was responding to pressure from the Asiatic Exclusion Leauge in California that had the ultimate goal of ending Japanese immigration to California. Japanese Americans protested, but when they were unable to succeed in their efforts to change the School Board's decision, they alerted the Japanese media and Japanese government officials.

CuriPow on 06/02/2021

From Guangdong To Yale

Yung Wing is the first-known Chinese student to graduate from an American university. He graduated from Yale in 1854, where he was a member of the choir, played football, was a member of the boat club and won academic prizes for English competitions.

CuriPow on 06/01/2021

The Next 28 Years

George Henry White, lawyer, legislator, congressman, and racial spokesman was born near Rosindale in Bladen County North Carolina, the son of Wiley F. and Mary White. It is possible that he was born into slavery, although the evidence on this is contradictory. He did attend public schools in North Carolina and received training under D. P. Allen, president of the Whitten Normal School in Lumberton. In 1876 he was an assistant in charge of the exhibition mounted by the U.S. Coast Survey at the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia. After graduation from Howard University in 1877, he was principal of the Colored Grade School, the Presbyterian parochial school, and the State Normal School in New Bern. He studied law under Judge William J. Clarke and received a license to practice in North Carolina in 1879.

CuriPow on 05/31/2021

The Motorcycle Queen of Miami

Bessie Stringfield was the first Jamaican-American woman to ride across the United States solo and was one of the few civilian motorcycle dispatch riders for the United States Army during World War II. Credited with breaking down barriers for both women and African-American motorcyclists, she was inducted into the Motorcycle Hall of Fame.